Involvera beslutsfattare och ledningspersonal i arbetet, till exempel när ni utför användartester.1

it can be any method that your team finds effective – as long as it involves decisionmakers watching, in person, real live customers flail around with the product 2

There’s no substitute for having stakeholders physically present during customer research. If stakeholders are there, they buy into the process. No one needs a master’s degree in human factors to understand that three customers in a row failing at the same place is cause for immediate improvement.

”Build products and offer services you can manage. It’s easy to make promises. It’s much harder to keep them. Make sure whatever it is that you’re doing is something you can actually sustain — organizationally, strategically, and financially.”

Kid using a computer

Conversely, if the UX team just delivers a report or some Powerpoint bullets about research that no one attended, executives have no buy-in, and things stay the same.

Avoid building walls between your customers and the development/design team. Don’t outsource customer support to a call center or third party. Do it yourself. You, and your whole team, should know what your customers are saying. When your customers are annoyed, you need to know about it. You need to hear their complaints. You need to get annoyed too. https://gettingreal.37signals.com/ch14_Feel_The_Pain.php

Photo by Dan Cramer from Provo, USA – Flickr.com – image description page, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=332995

Referenser

1. Små, snabba tester

2. One number to grade any executive

I oktober 2013 fick managementexperten Jeffrey Zients uppdraget att laga HealthCare.gov, även känt som Obamacare, efter en katastrofal lansering. På två månader skapade hans arbetslag en fungerande lösning som

“I rule!”

Bygg in lärande i processen

Engagera ledningen tidigt

Presentera ingångar i projektet Fokusera på deras lärande Bygg på tidigare genomgångar/ känd kunskap

The Key to Successful Tech Management

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jtPvFM3BznYS3eIGUI231M6d9QoJBY6zEINWs6JA2ug/edit#heading=h.6tjuyw7d0klc

https://www.evernote.com/shard/s5/sh/a48edf8b-6120-4c6d-b138-b0a336eb127f/217f847a04dc4f80

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zSV3WD8BKkKDB9hk43DUbyjI3kioJqq64O30n2_fQ-s/edit

http://matthewburton.org/government-web-products/

http://thehealthcareblog.com/blog/2015/06/02/why-large-scale-government-it-projects-fail-and-what-to-do-about-it/

http://headrush.typepad.com/creating_passionate_users/2005/02/spiral_learning.html

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jtPvFM3BznYS3eIGUI231M6d9QoJBY6zEINWs6JA2ug/edit#heading=h.n1f4yzl7xcd3

The most important resource you have is your own ability to change your mind.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXQb-yhqktQ Learning as you go is the essential resource. Start with the wrong idea and be willing to test it in the real world. It’s the people who do Something who learn. Start with Course Correction. Wikipedia is plan B. Build up your own ability to understand the problem. Build the first prototype to show ourselves that we don’t yet understand the problem. Something that is concretely wrong is what people need to understand what they need.